“Diverse Communities Make Minnesota Great”


Ilhan Omar called for “dismantling” America‘s “economy and political system” in the name of fighting racism and “oppression.” Some suggest she prefers Somalia.

I Love What You've Done To This Place

Ilhan Abdullahi Omar (born October 4, 1982) Omar… has advocated for… abolishing U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Omar was born in Mogadishu, Somalia on October 4, 1982. Omar’s family secured asylum in the U.S. and arrived in New York in 1995

‘My choice’: Ilhan Omar becomes first to wear hijab in US …

Jan 3, 2019 Twenty-three years after leaving a refugee camp in Kenya, Ilhan Omar on Thursday became the first member of the US Congress to wear a hijab.. Rules were changed to allow Omar, a Muslim sworn in on …

Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib on Trump: ‘Impeach the Motherfucker’

Hours after Rep. Rashida Tlaib made headlines for being sworn in as one of the two first Muslim female members of Congress on Thursday (alongside Minnesota’s Ilhan Omar), she told a cheering …

Somalis have Changed Minneapolis – American Thinker

“Everyone not lying to themselves predicted when the federal government under Bill Clinton – aided and abetted by Lutheran Social Services, Catholic Charities and World Relief Minnesota — plopped 30,000 Somalis down into the midst of the kind, virtue-signaling, eager-to-help Midwesterners of Minneapolis (of which I am one) that it would lead to some grave consequences for our community.

Now, due to continuing refugee placements as well as chain migration there are an estimated 80,000 Somalis living in the Twin Cities metro area, or more like 79,000 if you subtract those who’ve left the country to join terrorist organizations like ISIS.”

How did the Twin Cities become a hub for Somali immigrants …

While attending the University of Minnesota, Lakeville native Erik Borg wondered how the Twin Cities came to have such a large population of Somali Americans. Many, he noticed, lived near the campus.

[snip]

Many Somalis also migrated here directly from Africa as “primary” refugee arrivals, meaning that Minnesota was the first state in the United States where they moved. A group of voluntary agencies, including Lutheran Social Service and Catholic Charities, worked with the federal government to resettle the refugees and help them find housing and jobs. Minnesota was a favored location in part due to the success of resettling Hmong refugees in the 1970s and 1980s. As more Somalis formed a larger community, they drew even more friends and family members who wanted to be among their own.

“I think we had a reputation for being a good place to raise a family, a good place to find employment, and a welcoming community, so those were really factors that attracted the families to want to come here,” said Maureen Warren, vice president and chief family service officer at Lutheran Social Service of Minnesota.

[snip]

According to statistics kept by the Minnesota Department of Health, the state began accepting Somali “primary” refugee arrivals in 1993. Primary refugee arrivals remained at several hundred a year throughout the 1990s and exploded in the 2000s, reaching a peak of 3,639 in 2006.

Yet the number of new Somali refugees in Minnesota has fallen dramatically in recent years — dipping to 48 in 2018 — as President Donald Trump has dramatically reduced the number of refugees that America accepts.

The number of Somali-born people living outside of their homeland more than doubled to 2 million between 1990 and 2015, according to the Pew Research Center. The United Nations says that Somalia is one of five countries that together produce two-thirds of the world’s refugees; another is Myanmar, which is also a major source of newer refugees in Minnesota.

MPR: Hunter kills six, wounds two after tree-stand dispute

Michael Yang, a Hmong activist, said various Hmong groups held an emergency meeting Monday to talk about how to respond. Those at the meeting heard stories from some Hmong hunters about friction with white hunters. The shooting has already provoked racial tension in an area of Wisconsin where deer hunting is steeped in tradition. “It’s pathetic.

[snip]

Locals have complained that the Hmong, refugees from Laos, do not understand the concept of private property and hunt wherever they see fit. In Minnesota, a fistfight once broke out after Hmong hunters crossed onto private land, said Ilean Her, director of the St. Paul-based Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

[snip]

“It’s pathetic. They let all these foreigners in here, and they walk all over everybody’s property,” said Jim Arneberg, owner of the Haugen Inn in nearby Haugen.

Do You Remember the MASS RIOTS AND LOOTING After Muslim …

Somali American police officer Mohamed Noor shot Aussie Justine Damond in July 2017. Damond called the police to report a possible assault down the alley behind her home. When she went out to meet the police car in her pajamas Noor reached over his partner and shot her dead. Mohamed was the first Somali officer…

Diverse Communities Make Minnesota Great | Explore Minnesota

Minnesota has long been a melting pot of cultures. From the Dakota and Ojibwe, to the Swedes, to the state’s Hmong, Somali and Mexican communities, every wave of newcomers makes Minnesota culture richer and more diverse. During your visit, be sure to explore the many diverse communities that make Minnesota unique.

Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War by Mark Bowden

Black Hawk Down: A Story of Modern War gives readers an impressively comprehensive look at the deplorably mismanaged U.S. military raid in Mogadishu, Somalia on 3 October 1993. 99 American troops, a force comprised predominately of Army Rangers and Delta Force operators, descended on the Bakara Market in order to capture two of Mohamed Farrah Aidid’s valued lieutenants.

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