Mystery In St. Louis: Report Asserts Policing Has Become More Reactive Than Proactive – with “lack of cohesion at the executive level, creating ambiguity… who is leading… during events such as protests…”


June 2, 2020 – ‘Mayhem’: Four St. Louis Cops Shot, Police Chief Questions Goal of Riots

While in-between jobs, mostly peaceful rioter protests racism: institutionalized, police, structural, systemic, unconscious, white, etc. and xenophobia in St. Louis, Missouri.


June 4, 2020 – All rioters, arsonists, and looters have been released from jail in St. Louis, Missouri, without facing charges thus far by city prosecutors. Throughout riots in St. Louis this week, only 36 individuals were arrested for rioting, looting, and committing arson.

August 2, 2020 – Given the Democrats’ wink and a nod to the rioters while defunding police, it’s not a reach to describe BLM/Antifa as the militant wing of the Democratic Party.


The report stated that as of Dec. 6, St. Louis had experienced 247 murders in 2020 — a rate 17% higher than the city’s most violent year, which was 1993.

Report finds St. Louis police lack cohesion, officers have adopted ‘fire-fighting’ mentality

They wrote that officers expressed a perceived lack of cohesion at the executive level, creating ambiguity or uncertainty around who is leading the law enforcement effort during events such as protests and who is calling the shots when it comes to using military weapons, ammunition and equipment during those demonstrations.

violent crimes against people, including homicide, rape, robbery and assault were up 90% in the downtown area, compared with the same time period last year.

The Ethical Society of Police released a statement in part asserting the study failed to adequately address systemic racism, a culture of violence in SLMPD and diversity.

By Dana Rieck Of The St. Louis American – Dec 23, 2020 Updated Dec 25, 2020

A 42-page report on the status of the St. Louis metro and county police departments consistently reiterated its employees think the agencies lack cohesion and unity — which has led to, in part, a fire-fighting mentality “in which they respond reactively to all calls for service in the absence of a clearly-articulated organizational plan.” 

Mayor Lyda Krewson, Public Safety Director Jimmie Edwards and Police Chief John Hayden announced the results of the six-month, outside review of the police departments July 1; it was released publicly Monday. 

St. Louis Regional Business Council and the companies of Civic Progress, a coalition of local businesses that work to improve the St. Louis region, funded the study. 

The study makes recommendations tailored to address the city’s crime rates, critical recruitment problem and complex public safety governance. 

Hayden declined to be interviewed about the report’s findings. Krewson also declined an interview. Her media spokesperson Jacob Long said Krewson had not finished reading the report. Edwards did not return a call for comment.

Teneo Risk conducted the study. The firm provides risk consulting and risk advisory services to a wide range of clients. 

The study began by outlining the history of the police department and the city’s struggle with violent crime. The study noted St. Louis has witnessed significant increases in murder and aggravated assaults with a gun in recent years, and the department’s solve rate is less than 25%, compared to the national average of 60%.

The report stated that as of Dec. 6, St. Louis had experienced 247 murders in 2020 — a rate 17% higher than the city’s most violent year, which was 1993.

The report also noted two significant advancements: the implementation of body-worn cameras in November and the implementation of the SwiftProtect records management system, which should be completed in 2021

The study’s authors conducted interviews with major St. Louis-area businesses, government, law enforcement and community leaders.

They wrote that officers expressed a perceived lack of cohesion at the executive level, creating ambiguity or uncertainty around who is leading the law enforcement effort during events such as protests and who is calling the shots when it comes to using military weapons, ammunition and equipment during those demonstrations.

This lack of cohesion and lack of an organized plan to reduce crime, the report stated, has led to officers finding themselves in a constant “fire-fighting” mode, meaning they are reactively responding to all calls for service instead of having a unified approach aimed at reducing crime rates. This leads to officer burnout and persistent rates of crime and disorder.

Furthermore, the study noted the coronavirus pandemic has further challenged the effectiveness of the department’s ability to fight crime, citing that while overall crime in the city was down about 1% from January to September 2020, violent crimes against people, including homicide, rape, robbery and assault were up 90% in the downtown area, compared with the same time period last year.

The Ethical Society of Police released a statement in part asserting the study failed to adequately address systemic racism, a culture of violence in SLMPD and diversity. They also called out county officials for attempting to withhold demographic information relative to employment, discipline, and promotion and assert they tried to have the Teneo review team sign a non-disclosure agreement. 

“One has to question the motives in that. How committed can St. Louis County be to address the issues when an extraordinary effort was made not to provide the information,” The Society wrote in a statement.

While there are pages of recommendations regarding things like resource allocation, crime control, technology use and communication, there were three main areas for improvement that the study outlined, listed below as they appear in the report:   

1. The department should consider reorganization of personnel, bureaus and specialized units to maximize efficiencies leveraging existing resources.

2. The department should create and implement a more data-driven, community-focused, long-term crime fighting strategy.

3. The department should empower the chief to select senior personnel, predicated upon the needs of the department, and to develop a forward-looking strategic plan for the organization. 

The full report may be found online at bit.ly/34zRVtV

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