U.S. Olympic Committee Will Allow Athletes To Protest Against The U.S. While Representing The U.S. Around The World


Guess How Much U.S. Olympic Committee Execs Make?

May 22, 2012 – Blackmun’s total compensation, $902,977, included a base salary of $456,211 and a long-term performance bonus of some $140,000 he is scheduled to receive in 2014.


NFL players kneel for ‘Star-Spangled Banner’ and stand for ‘God Save the Queen’ at Wembley Stadium on September 24, 2017 in London, England.


Olympic officials to allow raised fists and kneeling during anthem

Christopher BritoThu, April 1, 2021, 6:51 AM

The U.S. Olympic and Paralympic Committee (USOPC) said Tuesday that it will allow athletes to kneel during the national anthem and raise their fists at Olympic trials, as the organization continues to review the decades-long policy of banning protests at the Games ahead of the Tokyo Olympics and Paralympics.

In a nine-page document released Tuesday, the committee outlined racial and social demonstrations that would “not be punished or undermined” by the USOPC or impact an athlete’s participation in the Olympic and Paralympic Trials events. The guidance, which came with the help of the athlete-led Team USA Council on Racial and Social Justice, comes months after the USOPC announced in December it would not discipline players for protesting peacefully at the Olympics and Pan American Games.

USOPC CEO Sarah Hirchland said in a letter to athletes that the new rules defines the “latitude” for them to “express their personal perspectives on racial and social justice in a respectful way, and without fear of sanction from the USOPC.”

Among the allowed protests include: raising a fist at the medal podium; kneeing on the medal podium or national anthem; and wearing a hat with phrases such as “Black Lives Matter,” “Trans Lives Matter” or words such as “equality” or “justice.” The USOPC is also permitting athletes to orally advocate for BIPOC individuals or other historically underrepresented or marginalized groups as well as speaking out against police violence and systemic police discrimination against Black or other marginalized groups.

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