Rule By One Yes Or No: On May 18 Pennsylvania Voters Will Decide


Altoona Mirror   Gov. Trying to Influence with Wording

Spotlight PA  Ballot questions should be clear, but two written by the Wolf administration don’t pass the test

Questions on the May 18 Primary Election Ballot

What You’ll See on the Ballot

The questions will appear on the May 18 ballot as follows. Voters need to be aware questions one and two were written by the governor’s Department of State using language that is far from impartial.

Ballot Question #1

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law and increase the power of the General Assembly to unilaterally terminate or extend a disaster emergency declaration – and the powers of Commonwealth agencies to address the disaster regardless of its severity pursuant to that declaration – through passing a concurrent resolution by simple majority, thereby removing the existing check and balance of presenting a resolution to the Governor for approval or disapproval?

Context for Ballot Question #1

This proposed amendment comes in response to the governor’s veto of House Resolution 836 of 2020, which would have put an end to the COVID-19 disaster declaration and the governor’s unilateral authority to handle it. While state law authorizes the General Assembly to end disaster declarations with a resolution, the governor insisted – and the court agreed – that resolution was subject to his approval or veto. Under this constitutional amendment, a concurrent resolution terminating or extending a disaster emergency declaration need not be presented to the governor for his signature.

What Your Vote Means

A YES Vote on Ballot Question #1 means a majority of PA state lawmakers, elected by the people, can vote to end emergency declarations and restrictions on citizens.

A NO Vote on Ballot Question #1 means a governor, alone, holds the power to continue emergency restrictions indefinitely even if a legislative majority votes to end them.


Ballot Question #2

Shall the Pennsylvania Constitution be amended to change existing law so that: a disaster emergency declaration will expire automatically after 21 days, regardless of the severity of the emergency, unless the General Assembly takes action to extend the disaster emergency; the Governor may not declare a new disaster emergency to respond to the dangers facing the Commonwealth unless the General Assembly passes a concurrent resolution; the General Assembly enacts new laws for disaster management?

Context for Ballot Question #2

This proposed amendment comes in response to the TWO extended disaster emergency declarations under which we are currently operating. Under this constitutional amendment, disaster declarations would be limited to no more than 21 days, allowing time for the General Assembly to be called into session and meet possible emergency needs. If a governor believes the declaration should last longer, he or she would have to gain approval of the General Assembly by sharing information and data to prove the need for extending the declaration. Under current law, a governor can declare a disaster emergency for a period of up to 90 days and can renew it as often as he or she likes.

What Your Vote Means

A YES Vote on Ballot Question #2 means emergency declarations would be limited to 21 days unless the General Assembly, elected by the people, approves longer.

A NO Vote on Ballot Question #2 means a governor, alone, can extend declarations, including “emergency” provisions, business closures, and restrictions indefinitely.

Source


Pa. Supreme Court sides with governor in dispute over emergency powers…

July 1, 2020 – The Pennsylvania Supreme Court sided with Gov. Tom Wolf in a dispute with the legislature over the extent of his emergency powers, bolstering the governor’s authority to manage the state’s …


Bill Rivers: Partisanship on PA Supreme Court turns robes into rags

To understand how the Commonwealth’s highest court became a Democratic policy backstop, go back to 2015 and the most expensive judicial race in U.S. history. Seven candidates raised $15.8 million, with $9 million going to the three Democrats: Kevin Dougherty, David Wecht, and Christine Donohue. 

The result: a 5-2 majority for the Democrats. 

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